The Treasures That Prevail by Jen Karetnick

ADVANCE PRAISE

From Mom Egg Review:

“On encountering the hurricane-force voice of The Treasures That Prevail’s opening poem, ‘Miami as the Narrator of the Next Great American Novel: A Personetelle,’ I knew I was going to dive deeply, coming up for air only when necessary. The collection’s title is drawn from Adrienne Rich’s ‘Diving Into the Wreck,’ and Jen Karetnick turns a steely, unflinching eye toward the wrecks we are complicit in creating: in the environments of the land we inhabit, in the relationships we cultivate, and in the places we make our homes—both those we are unwilling to ever leave and those we are forced to flee…This collection is worth holding onto, and Jen Karetnick’s work is definitely worth seeking out.”

—Barbara Harroun

Read the entire review here.

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From Foreword Reviews:

“That ominous sloshing sound Jen Karetnick hears in her sleep is the warmer, ever-fatter Atlantic spilling over the brim of her Miami hometown. Denial be damned, this collection confronts climate change and poetically spotlights the damage awaiting low-lying coastal areas if meaningful action isn’t taken now. An MFA holder from the University of Miami, her work has appeared in numerous top journals.”

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Goodreads and LibraryThing Reviews

“The Treasures That Prevail by Jen Karetnick is a quirky collection of poems about climate change, specifically in Miami. There are 65 poems in the collection (all different types), which are told from two alternating points of view. This book is recommended for those who have a passion for poetry and are passionate about environmental issues.”

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“It was a witty book of poetry that was hard to put down. I enjoyed reading the flow of beautiful ideas. I would recommend it to poetry enthusiasts.”

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“There is an overall theme to the poems–namely a hurricane bearing down on Miami. I like to think that this collection may spawn an original genre–Speculative Fiction.  The feel is quite dark and morose, and death and destruction exist…but then again, they’ve always existed. The ocean gives AND takes away–a global game you can’t help but play–participation is mandatory. Miami WAS there…right?”

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“I would recommend this reading to those that love avant-garde poetry”

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“This book is very powerful, thought provoking. I didn’t expect it to be a very dark book because I didn’t read the synopsis fully, so that I don’t ruin or spoil the poems for myself. I really enjoyed it, but at some point [it] made me cringe. It’s very descriptive but in a very short sense of way. I’m going to read it again to [find] all my favorite parts because it’s very honest, and I really like that. I felt a lot of power in every word. That is absolutely fantastic, and I love the social aspects in here because they all make sense even though they’re pretty dark. I love this, and I hope I get to read more books or poems like this in the future. Highly recommend for anyone that’s not afraid of the dark truths that are usually hidden.”

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This is a quirky little book of poetry. Not only does it play with very difficult-to-pull-off rhyme schemes (I think I saw a ghazal, a sonnet, a sestina, and a villanelle, but don’t quote me on that), each poem utilizes at least one “found” poetic verse. The result is that the Miami Karetnick depicts–one whose shores are buried by the wash of tidal floods (a result of global warming)–is construed through the happenstance of the detritus that bobs along the surface, both meaningnessly and meaningfully.

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